10 Most Common Speech Impediments & Language Disorders (2022)

As you get to know more about the field of speech-language pathology you’ll increasingly realize why SLPs are required to earn at least a master’s degree. This stuff is serious – and there’s nothing easy about it.

In 2016 the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders reported that 7.7% of American children have been diagnosed with a speech or swallowing disorder. That comes out to nearly one in 12 children, and gets even bigger if you factor in adults.

Whether rooted in psycho-speech behavioral issues, muscular disorders, or brain damage, nearly all the diagnoses SLPs make fall within just 10 common categories…

Types of Speech Disorders & Impediments

  1. Apraxia of Speech (AOS)

    Apraxia of Speech (AOS) happens when the neural pathway between the brain and a person’s speech function (speech muscles) is lost or obscured. The person knows what they want to say – they can even write what they want to say on paper – however the brain is unable to send the correct messages so that speech muscles can articulate what they want to say, even though the speech muscles themselves work just fine. Many SLPs specialize in the treatment of Apraxia.

    There are different levels of severity of AOS, ranging from mostly functional, to speech that is incoherent. And right now we know for certain it can be caused by brain damage, such as in an adult who has a stroke. This is called Acquired AOS.

    However the scientific and medical community has been unable to detect brain damage – or even differences – in children who are born with this disorder, making the causes of Childhood AOS somewhat of a mystery. There is often a correlation present, with close family members suffering from learning or communication disorders, suggesting there may be a genetic link.

    Mild cases might be harder to diagnose, especially in children where multiple unknown speech disorders may be present. Symptoms of mild forms of AOS are shared by a range of different speech disorders, and include mispronunciation of words and irregularities in tone, rhythm, or emphasis (prosody).

    Severe cases are more easily diagnosed, with symptoms including inability to articulate words, groping for sound positions, off-target movements that distort sounds, and inconsistency in pronunciation.

  1. Stuttering – Stammering

    Stuttering, also referred to as stammering, is so common that everyone knows what it sounds like and can easily recognize it. Everyone has probably had moments of stuttering at least once in their life. The National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders estimates that three million Americans stutter, and reports that of the up-to-10-percent of children who do stutter, three-quarters of them will outgrow it. It should not be confused with cluttering.

    Most people don’t know that stuttering can also include non-verbal involuntary or semi-voluntary actions like blinking or abdominal tensing (tics). Speech language pathologists are trained to look for all the symptoms of stuttering, especially the non-verbal ones, and that is why an SLP is qualified to make a stuttering diagnosis.

    The earliest this fluency disorder can become apparent is when a child is learning to talk. It may also surface later during childhood. Rarely if ever has it developed in adults, although many adults have kept a stutter from childhood.

    Stuttering only becomes a problem when it has an impact on daily activities, or when it causes concern to parents or the child suffering from it. In some people, a stutter is triggered by certain events like talking on the phone. When people start to avoid specific activities so as not to trigger their stutter, this is a sure sign that the stutter has reached the level of a speech disorder.

    (Video) Speech and Language Disorders

    The causes of stuttering are mostly a mystery. There is a correlation with family history indicating a genetic link. Another theory is that a stutter is a form of involuntary or semi-voluntary tic. Most studies of stuttering agree there are many factors involved.

    Because the causes of stuttering are largely unknown the treatments are mostly behavioral. Triggers often precede a stuttering episode, and SLPs can help people recognize and cope with these triggers ahead of time.

  1. Dysarthria

    Dysarthria is a symptom of nerve or muscle damage. It manifests itself as slurred speech, slowed speech, limited tongue, jaw, or lip movement, abnormal rhythm and pitch when speaking, changes in voice quality, difficulty articulating, labored speech, and other related symptoms.

    It is caused by muscle damage, or nerve damage to the muscles involved in the process of speaking such as the diaphragm, lips, tongue, and vocal chords.

    Because it is a symptom of nerve and/or muscle damage it can be caused by a wide range of phenomena that affect people of all ages. This can start during development in the womb or shortly after birth as a result of conditions like muscular dystrophy and cerebral palsy. In adults some of the most common causes of dysarthria are stroke, tumors, and MS.

    As an SLP there’s not much you can do about muscle damage, and even less you can do about nerve damage. So for treatments you’ll focus on managing the dysarthria symptoms through behavior changes. This can include helping a person slow down when they’re speaking, breath training, and exercising the muscles that are involved in speech.

  1. Lisping

    A lay term, lisping can be recognized by anyone and is very common.

    Speech language pathologists provide an extra level of expertise when treating patients with lisping disorders. They can make sure that a lisp is not being confused with another type of disorder such as apraxia, aphasia, impaired development of expressive language, or a speech impediment caused by hearing loss.

    SLPs are also important in distinguishing between the five different types of lisps. Most laypersons can usually pick out the most common type, the interdental/dentalised lisp. This is when a speaker makes a “th” sound when trying to make the “s” sound. It is caused by the tongue reaching past or touching the front teeth.

    Because lisps are functional speech disorders, SLPs can play a huge role in correcting these with results often being a complete elimination of the lisp. Treatment is particularly effective when implemented early, although adults can also benefit.

    Experts recommend professional SLP intervention if a child has reached the age of four and still has an interdental/dentalised lisp. SLP intervention is recommended as soon as possible for all other types of lisps. Treatment includes pronunciation and annunciation coaching, re-teaching how a sound or word is supposed to be pronounced, practice in front of a mirror, and speech-muscle strengthening that can be as simple as drinking out of a straw.

    Lisps usually develop during childhood, and children will often outgrow an interdental or dentalised lisp on their own.

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  1. Spasmodic Dysphonia

    Spasmodic Dysphonia (SD) is a chronic long-term disorder that affects the voice. It is characterized by a spasming of the vocal chords when a person attempts to speak and results in a voice that can be described as shaky, hoarse, groaning, tight, or jittery. It can cause the emphasis of speech to vary considerably. Many SLPs specialize in the treatment of Spasmodic Dysphonia.

    SLPs will most often encounter this disorder in adults, with the first symptoms usually occurring between the ages of 30 and 50. It can be caused by a range of things mostly related to aging, such as nervous system changes and muscle tone disorders.

    It’s difficult to isolate vocal chord spasms as being responsible for a shaky or trembly voice, so diagnosing SD is a team effort for SLPs that also involves an ear, nose, and throat doctor (otolaryngologist) and a neurologist.

    After diagnosis SLPs can have a role helping with coaching to optimize voice production, and can be particularly effective in mild cases of SD. This especially includes working on breathing control techniques to maintain a stead flow of air from the lungs.

  1. Cluttering

    Have you ever heard people talking about how they are smart but also nervous in large groups of people, and then self-diagnose themselves as having Asperger’s? You might have heard a similar lay diagnosis for cluttering. This is an indication of how common this disorder is as well as how crucial SLPs are in making a proper cluttering diagnosis.

    A fluency disorder, cluttering is characterized by a person’s speech being too rapid, too jerky, or both. To qualify as cluttering, the person’s speech must also have excessive amounts of “well,” “um,” “like,” “hmm,” or “so,” (speech disfluencies), an excessive exclusion or collapsing of syllables, or abnormal syllable stresses or rhythms.

    The first symptoms of this disorder appear in childhood. Like other fluency disorders, SLPs can have a huge impact on improving or eliminating cluttering. Intervention is most effective early on in life, however adults can also benefit from working with an SLP.

    Treatment methods include delayed audio feedback, syllable articulation and annunciation coaching, playing games that involve rapid word retrieval, practicing pausing and phrasing in sentences, and increasing a clutterer’s own self-awareness of what they are doing, such as through video recording.

  1. Muteness – Selective Mutism

    There are different kinds of mutism, and here we are talking about selective mutism. This used to be called elective mutism to emphasize its difference from disorders that caused mutism through damage to, or irregularities in, the speech process.

    Selective mutism is when a person does not speak in some or most situations, however that person is physically capable of speaking. It most often occurs in children, and is commonly exemplified by a child speaking at home but not at school.

    Selective mutism is related to psychology. It appears in children who are very shy, who have an anxiety disorder, or who are going through a period of social withdrawal or isolation. These psychological factors have their own origins and should be dealt with through counseling or another type of psychological intervention.

    Diagnosing selective mutism involves a team of professionals including SLPs, pediatricians, psychologists, and psychiatrists. SLPs play an important role in this process because there are speech language disorders that can have the same effect as selective muteness – stuttering, aphasia, apraxia of speech, or dysarthria – and it’s important to eliminate these as possibilities.

    (Video) 6 Types Of Speech Impediment | Psych Nerd

    And just because selective mutism is primarily a psychological phenomenon, that doesn’t mean SLPs can’t do anything. Quite the contrary.

    SLPs can play an important role through working with selectively mute children to create a tailored behavioral treatment program and address speech and language disorders – such as stuttering – that may be contributing to psychological factors like excessive shyness.

  1. Aphasia

    The National Institute on Neurological Disorders and Stroke estimates that one million Americans have some form of aphasia.

    Aphasia is a communication disorder caused by damage to the brain’s language capabilities. Aphasia differs from apraxia of speech and dysarthria in that it solely pertains to the brain’s speech and language center.

    As such anyone can suffer from aphasia because brain damage can be caused by a number of factors. However SLPs are most likely to encounter aphasia in adults, especially those who have had a stroke. Other common causes of aphasia are brain tumors, traumatic brain injuries, and degenerative brain diseases.

    In addition to neurologists, speech language pathologists have an important role in diagnosing aphasia. As an SLP you’ll assess factors such as a person’s reading and writing, functional communication, auditory comprehension, and verbal expression.

    Because the field of brain damage repair is in its infancy, your role as an SLP is to help with coping methods and strategies. The brain is a remarkable organ, and sometimes when one part gets damaged another part will try and pick up the slack. That means you can also try working on activities to improve the language skills that have been affected by the brain damage – sometimes this can have an effect.

  1. Speech Delay – Alalia

    A speech delay, known to professionals as alalia, refers to the phenomenon when a child is not making normal attempts to verbally communicate. There can be a number of factors causing this to happen, and that’s why it’s critical for a speech language pathologist to be involved.

    The are many potential reasons why a child would not be using age-appropriate communication. These can range anywhere from the child being a “late bloomer” – the child just takes a bit longer than average to speak – to the child having brain damage. It is the role of an SLP to go through a process of elimination, evaluating each possibility that could cause a speech delay, until an explanation is found.

    Approaching a child with a speech delay starts by distinguishing among the two main categories an SLP will evaluate: speech and language.

    Speech has a lot to do with the organs of speech – the tongue, mouth, and vocal chords – as well as the muscles and nerves that connect them with the brain. Disorders like apraxia of speech and dysarthria are two examples that affect the nerve connections and organs of speech. Other examples in this category could include a cleft palette or even hearing loss.

    The other major category SLPs will evaluate is language. This relates more to the brain and can be affected by brain damage or developmental disorders like autism. There are many different types of brain damage that each manifest themselves differently, as well as developmental disorders, and the SLP will make evaluations for everything.

    (Video) CHAPTER 39 SPEECH AND LANGUAGE DISORDER RECORDING 1

    Once the cause or causes for the speech delay are identified then the SLP can go to work treating and monitoring the child. For many speech-language disorders that cause a speech delay, early intervention and evaluation by an SLP can make a huge difference.

  1. Issues Related to Autism

    While the autism spectrum itself isn’t a speech disorder, it makes this list because the two go hand-in-hand more often than not.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that one out of every 68 children in our country have an autism spectrum disorder. And by definition, all children who have autism also have social communication problems.

    Speech-language pathologists are often a critical voice on a team of professionals – also including pediatricians, occupational therapists, neurologists, developmental specialists, and physical therapists – who make an autism spectrum diagnosis.

    In fact, the American Speech-Language Hearing Association reports that problems with communication are the first detectable signs of autism. That is why language disorders – specifically disordered verbal and nonverbal communication – are one of the primary diagnostic criteria for autism.

    So what kinds of SLP disorders are you likely to encounter with someone on the autism spectrum?

    A big one is apraxia of speech. A study that came out of Penn State in 2015 found that 64 percent of children who were diagnosed with autism also had childhood apraxia of speech.

    A study published in the National Center for Biotechnology Information out of Harvard Medical School cites muteness, involuntarily repetition of another person’s vocalizations (echolalia), and unusual inflection and tone (prosody) as also being characteristics of people on the autism spectrum, especially children. It points out that in general language abilities are impaired or delayed at an early age.

This basic primer on the most common speech disorders offers little more than an interesting glimpse into the kind of issues that SLPs work with patients to resolve. But even knowing everything there is to know about communication science and speech disorders doesn’t tell the whole story of what this profession is all about. With every client in every therapy session, the goal is always to have the folks that come to you for help leave with a little more confidence than when they walked in the door that day. As a trusted SLP, you will build on those gains with every session, helping clients experience the joy and freedom that comes with the ability to express themselves freely. At the end of the day, this is what being an SLP is all about.

Ready to make a difference in speech pathology? Learn how to become a Speech-Language Pathologist today

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(Video) Examples of different levels of severity in Childhood Apraxia of Speech (CAS)

FAQs

What are the common speech and language disorders? ›

American Speech-Language-Hearing Association: “Preschool Language Disorders,” “Speech Sound Disorders,” “Adult Speech and Language,” “Apraxia of Speech in Adults,” “Dysarthria,” “Early Identification of Speech, Language, and Hearing Disorders.”

How many types of speech and language impairments are there? ›

There are three general categories of speech impairment: Fluency disorder. This type can be described as an unusual repetition of sounds or rhythm. Voice disorder.

What are examples of a speech impediment? ›

Examples of articulation speech impairments include sound omissions, substitutions, and distortions. Phonological disorders result in the misuse of certain speech sounds to form words. Conditions include fronting, stopping, and the omission of final consonants.

What is the most common type of speech impairment quizlet? ›

Phonological and articulation disorders are the most common speech disorders, affecting 10% of preschool and school-aged children. The most common types of articulation disorders include, distortions, substitutions, omissions, and additions.

How common are language disorders? ›

Children must also have the physical ability to form speech. Up to 1 of every 20 children has symptoms of a language disorder. When the cause is unknown, it is called a developmental language disorder.

What are common speech disorders in childhood? ›

1. Articulation Disorder. This speech disorder causes children to mispronounce certain sounds such as S or R. Difficulty pronouncing S is called a lisp and is the most common type of articulation disorder.

Are speech impediments common? ›

In 2016 the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders reported that 7.7% of American children have been diagnosed with a speech or swallowing disorder. That comes out to nearly one in 12 children, and gets even bigger if you factor in adults.

What are the 5 communication disorders? ›

In the DSM-5, communication disorders are broken into the following categories:
  • Language disorder.
  • Speech sound disorder.
  • Childhood-onset fluency disorder (stuttering)
  • Social (pragmatic) communication disorder.
  • Unspecified communication disorder.
Mar 23, 2022

What is the difference between a speech disorder and a language disorder? ›

Difference between Speech and Language Disorders

Difficulties pronouncing sounds and stuttering are examples of speech disorders. When a child has trouble understanding others or sharing thoughts, ideas, and feelings completely, then he or she has a language disorder.

What's a language disorder? ›

A child may have a language disorder if he has difficulty getting his meaning across through speech, writing, or even gestures. Some children have a language disorder even though they produce sounds well and have clear speech. Difficulty expressing meaning to other people is called an expressive language disorder.

What are the causes of speech and language disorders? ›

Some causes of speech and language disorders include hearing loss, neurological disorders, brain injury, intellectual disabilities, drug abuse, physical impairments such as cleft lip or palate and vocal abuse or misuse.

What are the 4 types of articulation disorders? ›

What Are Speech Sound (Articulation) Disorders
  • Organic speech sound disorder. ...
  • Functional speech disorder. ...
  • Developmental phonological disorder. ...
  • Developmental apraxia of speech. ...
  • Developmental dysarthria.

What type of disorder is an impairment in the ability to receive send process and comprehend concepts or verbal nonverbal and graphic symbols? ›

The American Speech and Hearing Association (ASHA) defines communication disorder as: "An impairment in the ability to receive, send, process, and comprehend concepts or verbal, nonverbal and graphic symbol systems. A communication disorder may be evident in the processes of hearing, language, and/or speech.

What causes an articulation disorder? ›

What causes articulation impairment? Articulation impairment can occur due to physical structural problems with the mouth or face (like cleft lip or palate), neurological/developmental disorders, hearing loss plus other causes. Often the cause is unknown.

What types of conditions would a communication disorder result in severe limitations for the individual? ›

Additionally, speech and language limitations might occur due to stroke, cerebral palsy, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington's Disease, oral and laryngeal cancer, hearing impairment, traumatic brain injury, dementia, chronic laryngitis, and vocal cord paralysis.

Is autism a speech impediment? ›

Nearly two-thirds of children with autism may suffer from a rare speech disorder characterized by difficulty coordinating the use of their tongue, lips, mouth and jaw to produce speech. The condition, known as apraxia, is typically found in one or two out of 1,000 children.

Why can't I say R? ›

Rhotacism is a speech impediment that is defined by the lack of ability, or difficulty in, pronouncing the sound R. Some speech pathologists, those who work with speech impediments may call this impediment de-rhotacization because the sounds don't become rhotic, rather they lose their rhotic quality.

What is a common speech? ›

The Common Speech is the official language used by the humans inhabitants of the Northern part of the continent and in newer provinces recently conquered by the Nilfgaardian Empire such as Geso, Ebbing and Toussaint. It also refers to languages that arose after the Conjunction of the Spheres.

What are the 10 psychological disorders? ›

  • Anxiety Disorders.
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • Bipolar Disorder.
  • Depression.
  • Psychosis.
  • Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders.
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Trauma.
  • Co-occurring Substance Use Disorder and Addiction.

What are the different types of communication impairments and disorders? ›

Communication disorders are grouped into four main categories: speech disorders, language disorders, hearing disorders, and central auditory processing disorders.
  • Speech Disorders. ...
  • Language Disorders. ...
  • Hearing disorders. ...
  • Central auditory processing disorders (CAPD)
Sep 22, 2021

What is the most common communication disorder in students? ›

Causes & Symptoms

One of the most common causes of communication disorders among children is hearing loss. Nearly 15% of children have some degree of hearing loss in one or both ears. This health condition can be caused by existing medical conditions, genetic history, or exposure to loud noise.

What are the 5 communication disorders? ›

In the DSM-5, communication disorders are broken into the following categories:
  • Language disorder.
  • Speech sound disorder.
  • Childhood-onset fluency disorder (stuttering)
  • Social (pragmatic) communication disorder.
  • Unspecified communication disorder.
Mar 23, 2022

Are speech impediments common? ›

In 2016 the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders reported that 7.7% of American children have been diagnosed with a speech or swallowing disorder. That comes out to nearly one in 12 children, and gets even bigger if you factor in adults.

What is it called when you can't say r? ›

Rhotacism is a difficulty producing r sounds in the respective language's standard pronunciation.

Why can't I say R? ›

Rhotacism is a speech impediment that is defined by the lack of ability, or difficulty in, pronouncing the sound R. Some speech pathologists, those who work with speech impediments may call this impediment de-rhotacization because the sounds don't become rhotic, rather they lose their rhotic quality.

What are the 10 psychological disorders? ›

  • Anxiety Disorders.
  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • Bipolar Disorder.
  • Depression.
  • Psychosis.
  • Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders.
  • Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Trauma.
  • Co-occurring Substance Use Disorder and Addiction.

What are language disorders? ›

Language disorder is a communication disorder that can affect kids. Children with language disorder have trouble understanding and speaking language. They may struggle with written language, spoken language or both.

What are the different types of communication impairments and disorders? ›

Communication disorders are grouped into four main categories: speech disorders, language disorders, hearing disorders, and central auditory processing disorders.
  • Speech Disorders. ...
  • Language Disorders. ...
  • Hearing disorders. ...
  • Central auditory processing disorders (CAPD)
Sep 22, 2021

Is autism a speech impediment? ›

Nearly two-thirds of children with autism may suffer from a rare speech disorder characterized by difficulty coordinating the use of their tongue, lips, mouth and jaw to produce speech. The condition, known as apraxia, is typically found in one or two out of 1,000 children.

What causes speech and language disorders? ›

Some causes of speech and language disorders include hearing loss, neurological disorders, brain injury, intellectual disabilities, drug abuse, physical impairments such as cleft lip or palate and vocal abuse or misuse.

What is a common speech? ›

The Common Speech is the official language used by the humans inhabitants of the Northern part of the continent and in newer provinces recently conquered by the Nilfgaardian Empire such as Geso, Ebbing and Toussaint. It also refers to languages that arose after the Conjunction of the Spheres.

How do you spell the letter r? ›

R, or r, is the eighteenth letter of the modern English alphabet and the ISO basic Latin alphabet. Its name in English is ar (pronounced /ˈɑːr/), plural ars, or in Ireland or /ˈɔːr/.
...
R
Other letters commonly used withr(x), rh
18 more rows

What is a lisp? ›

A lisp is a speech impediment that specifically relates to making the sounds associated with the letters S and Z. Lisps usually develop during childhood and often go away on their own. But some persist and require treatment. Another name for lisping is sigmatism.

What does rhotic speech mean? ›

1 phonetics : of, relating to, having, or being an accent or dialect in English in which an /r/ sound is retained before consonants (as in pronouncing hard and cart) and at the end of a word (as in pronouncing car and far) a rhotic dialect/accent a rhotic speaker Arguably one of the greatest divisions in English is ...

How do you pronounce Indian r? ›

Learn Hindi Pronunciation - R Sound - YouTube

How do you pronounce RS? ›

How to pronounce the 'R' sound in English: Tips & Practice - YouTube

How do you say the number three? ›

How to Pronounce THREE [ ForB English Lesson ] - YouTube

Speech impediments can range from speech sound disorders (articulation and phonological disorders) to voice disorders.. Articulation disorders occur when a patient has difficulty producing speech sounds.. The following 10 conditions are examples of specific types of speech disorders and voice disorders.. The most common way that speech disorders are treated involves seeking professional help.. There are various types of speech therapy available to patients.

HOW IS STUTTERING TREATED?. Apraxia also involves saying made up words or saying “chicken” for “kitchen,” according to information from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association .. HOW IS APRAXIA TREATED?. While there’s no cure for this condition, your local ear, nose and throat physician may inject Botox into your vocal folds to loosen them.In addition, your speech language pathologist can provide voice therapy to help you communicate.. When your vocal folds are not able to move, it not only causes speech difficulties, but it can lead to serious breathing and swallowing problems.

Speech disorders are no uncommon condition.. There are certain speaking disorders that are more common than others, though.. We’re going to go over some of the most common speaking disorders that occur in both children and adults.. Children with this condition can:. Aphasia is a condition that occurs after a traumatic brain injury, usually stroke.. Difficulty or inability to speak because of autism spectrum disorder can be helped with speech therapy.

While some children are quick in picking up how to communicate verbally, some children take time and this causes the parents to worry about their child’s slow development of speech.. Stuttering affects 4 times as many males than females and most children outgrow stuttering leaving 1 % or less adults who continue to stutter.. Developmental stuttering is the most common form of stuttering that occurs in young children while they are still learning speech and language skills.. Treatment for Stuttering: It is important to work out the best treatment option with a speech specialist to treat this common speech disorder.. Apraxia of Speech is another common speech disorder or communication disorder in which a child has difficulty making accurate movements when speaking.. Signs of Childhood Apraxia of speech includes, not saying same words the same way each time they say it, problems imitating what others say and can understand what others say better than they can talk.. Patient suffering from this speech disorder also has to move the tongue and lips a number of times for sounds/speech to come out.. At certain ages, it is normal for making sound related mistakes, however, if they continue making such sound errors then it is an articulation disorder and it may negatively affect the child intelligibility.. Dysarthria does not include speech disorders from structural abnormalities, such as cleft palate; and must not be confused with Apraxia of speech.. Treatment of Dysarthria: Dysarthria can be treated by speech specialists using variety of techniques, such as exercises to strengthen muscles and tongue.. Expressive Language Disorder or ELD is a communication disorder in which children do not have a problem producing sounds and words, but find it difficult to retrieve the correct word or sound at the given time.. They have short memory span and find it difficult to understand what is said in group discussions.. Receptive-Expressive Language Disorder is a communication disorder in which a child finds it difficult to express oneself in the spoken word and is unable to understand what the other is saying to him or her.. He or she does not have a problem in pronouncing words; however, they face difficulty in forming proper coherent sentences, using correct grammar and other speech related problems.

Speech disorders prevent people from forming correct speech sounds, while language disorders affect a person’s ability to learn words or understand what others say to them.. Some people may also find that certain words or sounds can make a stutter more pronounced.. The brain controls every single action that people make, including speaking.. Dysarthria occurs when damage to the brain causes muscle weakness in a person’s face, lips, tongue, throat, or chest.. An SLP will evaluate a person for groups of symptoms that indicate one type of speech disorder.. Speech disorders affect a person’s ability to produce sounds that create words.

SLI can affect a child’s speaking, listening, reading, and writing.. If a doctor, teacher, or parent suspects that a child has SLI, a speech-language pathologist (a professional trained to assess and treat people with speech or language problems) can evaluate the child’s language skills.. This means that children with SLI are more likely to be diagnosed with a learning disability than children who do not have SLI.. Early treatment during the preschool years can improve the skills of many children with language delays, including those with SLI.. Improving speaking, reading, and writing skills.

Videos

1. Speech and Language Disorders in Children Implications for SSA’s Supplemental Security Income Progra
(NASEM Health and Medicine Division)
2. What is a Speech Disorder? Learn with a Speech Therapist
(Agents of Speech)
3. Speech and language disorders - Child Psychiatry PART-1
(Esther's classes)
4. Overview of possible causes and types of problems in speech development
(Mayo Clinic)
5. Developmental Language Disorder - Boys Town National Research Hospital Web
(BoysTownHospital)
6. How to Tell If My Child Has a Speech-Language Disorder
(Clarity Speech and Language)

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