How the Oldest People in America’s Blue Zone Make Their Money Last (2022)

What they're doing right in Loma Linda, Calif., and what the rest of us can learn

(In 2008, National Geographic writer Dan Buettner published his bestselling book, The Blue Zones: 9 Lessons for Living Longer From the People Who’ve Lived the Longest, about the five “longevity pockets” around the world. For this weekly series, Next Avenue Money and Work & Purpose editor Richard Eisenberg, a Gerontological Society of America Journalists in Aging Fellow, takes a different look at the Blue Zones — places where there’s a high concentration of people living past 90 without chronic illnesses. Rather than focusing on the residents’ diets, he reports on how the oldest people in the Blue Zones make their money last and what Americans and America can learn from this. This final installment, Part III, is about the Blue Zone of Loma Linda, Calif. Part II, was about the Blue Zones of Okinawa, Japan; Sardinia, Italy and Ikaria, Greece. Part I was about The Nicoya Peninsula of Costa Rica.)

How the Oldest People in America’s Blue Zone Make Their Money Last (2)

Credit: Next Avenue | John Gilman

I've been traveling and studying the world's five Blue Zones — areas with the highest concentration of people living past 90 without chronic illnesses. I was intrigued to visit Loma Linda, Calif. — America's only Blue Zone — because, on the surface, it's unlike the world's four other longevity zones. While the others are mostly poor islands, Loma Linda (which means "pretty hill") is a fairly affluent, small community and inland, about 65 miles due east of Los Angeles. Its tagline: "a city focused on health and prosperity."

Technically, Loma Linda itself isn’t the real Blue Zone. It gets that label because about a third of its 24,196 residents are part of a close-knit community that values physical and mental habits helping them live long, healthy, vibrant lives. They are Seventh Day Adventists; more than 250 members of its church on the Loma Linda University campus are 90 or older; another 425 are 80 to 89. Members of that Protestant denomination typically don’t drink alcohol or smoke; they’re frequently vegan and favor nuts and they’re often energetic, upbeat and social.

“We feel our body is a temple of God, so we always think about that when we eat,” said Ernie Zane, 92, who continues working part-time as an ophthalmologist.

As for exercise, Ester van den Hoven, 94, spoke for many in Loma Linda when she told me about her walking regimen: “I try to get a mile in a day. I feel bad when I don’t.” Ernie Zane walks roughly two miles a day. Leland Juhl, 94, spends 45 minutes to an hour a day at Loma Linda University’s recreational center and golfs two days a week.

The Blue Zone of Loma Linda: A Place of Vitality

Jab Thaipejr, Loma Linda’s city manager, told me: “Vitality is a good term for them. There’s a different mindset in Loma Linda. Instead of competition, it’s more focused on community, compassion and cooperation.

Unlike their Blue Zone sisters, Loma Linda isn’t a Blue Zone because of its number of centenarians. “It’s life expectancy-based” and focused on “disease-risk,” said Dr. Michael Orlich, one of the lead investigators for Loma Linda University's famed Adventist Health Study. “We’ve shown reductions in the risk for cardiovascular disease mortality, ovarian cancer and colorectal cancer in particular, and a lower risk of prostate cancer for vegans.” The researchers hope to look at dementia risk in the future.

(Video) The Island with the Oldest People on Earth (+100 Years)

It’s not that the Adventists didn’t get diseases comprising the leading causes of death. “They seemed to occur later,” “said Orlich. Overall, the Adventist Health Study concluded that male Adventists in California live six to seven years longer than non-Adventists there and female Adventists in the state live four years longer than non-Adventists in the state; these differences are similar nationally.

After interviewing six Loma Lindans in their 80s and 90s (mostly Adventists), I found these Blue Zoners were different than those in the other locations financially, too.

How They Manage Money in This Blue Zone

The reason they tend not to worry about running out of money — the No. 1 retirement fear of Americans, according to a 2019 Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies report — is that they’ve saved and invested diligently in stocks, bonds, mutual funds, annuities, 401(k) plans and rental real estate, often with help from financial advisers.

“If the country doesn’t go bankrupt, I should be all right,” Juhl told me. Bob Bass, 86, echoed that sentiment, saying: “I really don’t worry about it. I’m very fortunate.”

But, Seventh Day Adventist Pastor Dan Matthews, 84, said: “It would be inappropriate not to mention that no money we earn from any kind of source is [totally] ours; 90% is ours and 10% belongs to God. We always return [to the church] a faithful 10% tithe, and it probably turns out to be more like 20%.”

The concern so many other Americans about outliving their money is genuine and, sadly, appropriate.

“It’s a legitimate fear,” said Harry Dalessio, senior vice president and head of Prudential Retirement’s full service solutions. “It will cost, on average, hundreds of thousands of dollars in retirement to cover just health care, let alone living expenses and basic needs.”

As in the other four Blue Zones, the oldest people in Loma Linda tend to be frugal. “We started out, when we got married, writing down every penny we spent,” said Betsy Matthews, 81, an accountant who’s the wife of the pastor. “I think that has helped us immensely.” (Juhl told me he and his late wife did this, too.)

And, Betsy Matthews adds, Seventh Day Adventists “save money by not spending on cigarettes and alcohol, which is expensive.”

Vegetables, fruits and nuts at home, often grown there (like in other Blue Zones), tend to be less pricey than buying meat and eating out, too.

(Video) 8 Secrets to Living Past 100 Years Old (Mediterranean Diet or Blue Zone Lifestyle?)

Judith Chipps, a financial adviser at Merrill Lynch Wealth Management in the Los Angeles area (whose son-in-law is a Seventh Day Adventist) says the Adventists “live fairly spartan lives.”

The Link Between Health and Money

Tip-top health, due to diet and exercise, helps keep costs down, too, Orlich suspects. “I feel fine. I’ve been doing aerobics for 30 years. I take no medications. Nothing,” said Dorothy Zane, 86. (You may have seen Loma Lindans in their 80s and 90s swimming and working out in the Prudential commercial featuring the town due to its longevity.)

Loma Linda Adventists also tend to be cheery and sociable, which keeps their stress levels down and, in turn, their health costs. “Stress is definitely a killer; with prayer and turning things over to the Lord, there’s less stress,” said Juhl.

As I wrote in my last Blue Zones story, groups of elders in Okinawa belong to a “moai,” where they meet regularly and help each other out. In Loma Linda, bible study groups and friendship circles offer something similar, which helps relieve money concerns. Dorothy Zane told me she belongs to three bible study groups.

Dan Matthews said: “Betsy was with her friendship circle today and Betsy’s mother was once part of the group. Really, at some level, we are interdependent on each other.”

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Dr. Bruce Chernof, CEO of The SCAN Foundation, a California-based nonprofit focused on patient-centered health care for older Americans (and a prior funder of Next Avenue), says that for the Seventh Day Adventists in Loma Linda, “it’s about an architecture of beliefs that leads to being planful in a broader way.”

(Video) The People On This Greek Island Live Over 100 Years | The Art Of Living | Tonic

What Americans and America Can Do

In other words, because the older people in Loma Linda expect to live long lives, they plan intentional ways to live them out well and not run out of money.

As Chipps, of Merrill Lynch said, “If you live in a community where everyone is living to a ripe old age, you think about finances from an earlier age — because they have to last longer.”

But what about the rest of us in America who are less planful and not as healthy as the Seventh Day Adventists of Loma Linda but hope to live long lives? And what could policymakers do to help Americans avoiding running out of money at a time when we're living longer than ever?

Those of us in our 50s and older who are healthy can try to keep working as long as possible. That’s what the oldest people in the Blue Zones do.

“I worked an extra five or 10 years, said Loma Linda’s Bob Bass, 86, a former citrus ranch farmer. Working not only provides income, it helps you stay mentally engaged, and that’s good for you health. (In Loma Linda, Seventh Day Adventists don’t work on the Sabbath, from Friday sundown through Saturday, however.)

More broadly speaking, we can try harder to get, and stay, healthy, as the Blue Zones people usually do. That can help prevent astronomic medical bills. Maintaining and expanding your social network, helps, too. Buettner's Blue Zone team has a quiz to help you curate it to spend more time with people with positive outlooks.

We can also try harder to save and invest more, and regularly. That means having an emergency savings fund for unexpected expenses and a retirement savings fund, as all the oldest people I met in Loma Linda do.

“My clients who have been most successful at managing their money well into their 90s have saved money all along,” said Chipps. “A balanced investment portfolio [of stocks and bonds] over time will perform best for most people.”

She notes that people in their 50s and 60s are often in their peak earning years. “That’s a really good opportunity to do some serious retirement savings. Waiting to see what happens is probably not the best strategy," said Chipps.

The easiest way to do it is though a 401(k) or 403(b) savings plan through your employer, since it’s automatic. But many workers aren’t offered those plans either because their business or nonprofit doesn’t have one or they are self-employed. A few states have begun setting up plans for those people. California happens to be one.

“The CalSavers Secure Choice plan will be fully operational in July,” said Blanca Castro, AARP advocacy and metro manager, based in Sacramento. That will help the 7.5 million working state residents without access to plans.

(Video) Blue Zones: Secrets of a Long Life

State governments and the federal government could help older Americans make their money last in other ways, too. They could look for ways to lower health care costs, including the cost of prescription drugs. The governments of the other four Blue Zones provide national health insurance and sometimes require doctors to make house calls to needy older people.

States and the federal government could also pilot long-term care insurance programs, as Japan does to help its older population avoid staggering expenses that could otherwise destroy their finances. “I think the current approach we have is really, really broken and government could play a significant policy role in changing that dynamic,” said Chernof.

Governors could also take a cue from California’s newly elected leader Gavin Newsom. The Democratic governor is working on a Master Plan on Aging in his state, where the cost of living, especially housing, is especially high and where the older population is expected to double in 30 years. Blanca Castro reflected on the broad vision for California's plan, saying: “It will address where we don’t have policies or can improve ones we have so no matter how old you are, you have access to housing, transportation, health care, food and a place to socialize.”

And that kind of thing could help people make their money last anywhere.

(This is the third part of the three-part Next Avenue Series: Blue Zones: How the World’s Oldest People Make Their Money Last. It describes the Blue Zone of Loma Linda, Calif. Part II, published April 9, 2019, focused on the Blue Zones of Okinawa, Japan; Sardinia, Italy and Ikaria, Greece. Part I, published April 2, 2019, focused on the Blue Zone of the Nicoya Peninsula in Costa Rica. This article was written with the support of a journalism fellowship from the Gerontological Society of America, Journalists Network on Generations and The Commonwealth Fund.)

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How the Oldest People in America’s Blue Zone Make Their Money Last (7)

(Video) These People Tried The Blue Zones Diet For 3 Months: See What Happened | TODAY

Richard Eisenbergis the former Senior Web Editor of the Money & Security and Work & Purpose channels of Next Avenue and former Managing Editor for the site. He is the author of "How to Avoid a Mid-Life Financial Crisis" and has been a personal finance editor at Money, Yahoo, Good Housekeeping, and CBS MoneyWatch.Read More

FAQs

What is a Blue Zone in America? ›

Dubbed "blue zones," their lifestyle habits are now providing a blueprint for improving health in the United States. "These geographically isolated places that were living to age 100, about three to five times the rate we see in the U.S," said Michael Acker, Senior Vice President and General Manager of Sharecare.

How do people in Loma Linda live so long? ›

Today, a community of about 9,000 Adventists in the Loma Linda area are the core of America's blue zone region. They live as much as a decade longer than the rest of us, and much of their longevity can be attributed to vegetarianism and regular exercise.

What about this Blue Zone makes it special? ›

The Blue Zone regions are home to some of the oldest and healthiest people in the world. Although their lifestyles differ slightly, they mostly eat a plant-based diet, exercise regularly, drink moderate amounts of alcohol, get enough sleep and have good spiritual, family and social networks.

What can we do to make our community more like a Blue Zone? ›

Tips for ways to step into the blue zone include:
  1. Walk your children to school 1 day a week (or more). ...
  2. Let your children play in the street (with discretion). ...
  3. Build a community. ...
  4. Eat more vegetables – period. ...
  5. Eat with friends at work instead of at your desk. ...
  6. Add more fiber to your diet.
Jul 11, 2016

How do people live in the Blue Zone life? ›

Blue Zone Tenets
  1. Move naturally. The people who live the longest don't hit the gym or log 40 minutes during their morning run. ...
  2. Find purpose. ...
  3. Practice stress management. ...
  4. Eat less. ...
  5. Swap meat for plants. ...
  6. Hit happy hour…in moderation. ...
  7. Keep the faith. ...
  8. Put family first.
Oct 6, 2020

How much does it cost to live in Loma Linda? ›

Loma Linda cost of living is 126.8
COST OF LIVINGLoma LindaCalifornia
Health86.992.4
Housing187.6239.1
Median Home Cost$502,900$684,800
Utilities107.6102.4
4 more rows

What is the Loma Linda diet? ›

In Loma Linda, most people follow a Biblical diet consisting of organic whole grains, legumes, fruits, and vegetables. It also omits unclean and unacceptable foods, like pork and any seafood besides fish. One unique thing that stands out about the Loma Linda region is its citizens' strong sense of community.

Can Seventh-day Adventists drink milk? ›

Seventh-day Adventists abstain from smoking, drinking alcoholic beverages, and eating pork. About 50 percent are lacto-ovo- (milk-and-egg-using) vegetarians, and most Adventists do not use coffee, other caffeine-containing drinks, hot condiments, or spices.

What religion is Loma Linda? ›

Loma Linda University is part of the higher education system of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. The University's heritage and ethos reflect a dedication of loving service to people of all backgrounds and identities.

What do blue zones eat for breakfast? ›

Breakfasts. Centenarians from the blue zones typically eat a mainly plant-based diet. They favor beans, greens, yams and sweet potatoes, whole grains, fruits, nuts, and seeds. This recipe combines a few centenarians staples.

How long do people live in the Blue Zone? ›

While in the US, the average life expectancy is 78 years, in the Blue Zones, living to be over 100 isn't uncommon.

Why are blue zones so important? ›

The blue zones areas of the world share and benefit from a set of habits that we call the Power 9: practices that—together—increase longevity, health, and happiness. Our research has shown that these sets of behaviors and outlooks benefit people in these ways: Longer, healthier life.

What are the 9 secrets to longevity? ›

The nine lessons:
  • Move naturally. Don't do marathons or pump iron; work around the house, garden, walk, cycle, walk when talking on the phone. ...
  • Know your purpose. Have a reason for waking up in the morning.
  • Kick back. ...
  • Eat less. ...
  • Eat less meat. ...
  • Drink in moderation. ...
  • Have faith. ...
  • Power of love.
Nov 3, 2012

What is living in a Blue Zone? ›

He has discovered five places in the world – dubbed blue zones – where people live the longest, and are healthiest: Okinawa, Japan; Sardinia, Italy; Nicoya, Costa Rica; Ikaria, Greece, and Loma Linda, California.

What are 5 of the 9 things the blue zones have in common? ›

Many residents living in the original Blue Zones® areas share nine healthy lifestyle habits that help them live longer, healthier lives.
  • MOVE NATURALLY. The world's longest-lived people don't pump iron, run marathons or join gyms. ...
  • KNOW YOUR PURPOSE. ...
  • DOWN SHIFT. ...
  • 80% RULE. ...
  • PLANT SLANT. ...
  • WINE @ FIVE. ...
  • RIGHT TRIBE. ...
  • BELONG.

What can Adventists not eat? ›

Foods to Avoid on the Seventh-day Adventist Diet
  • Caffeine.
  • Alcohol.
  • Hot condiments.
  • Hot spices.
  • Pork.
Nov 13, 2021

What meat can Seventh-day Adventist eat? ›

Some Seventh-day Adventists eat 'clean' meats

Pork, rabbit, and shellfish are considered “unclean” and thus banned by Adventists. However, some Adventists choose to eat certain “clean” meats, such as fish, poultry, and red meats other than pork, as well as other animal products like eggs and low-fat dairy ( 5 ).

What are Adventists not allowed to do? ›

Adventists live modest lives, with a strict code of ethics. They don't smoke or drink alcohol, and recommend a vegetarian diet. Meat is permitted, but only following the Biblical commandments on clean and unclean food.

Why do Seventh-day Adventists live so long? ›

Health is central to the Adventists' faith and they have strict rules on diet, exercise and rest. Adventists typically avoid meat and dairy products and follow a 'biblical diet', or the way that those who lived thousands of years ago ate. It's a vegetarian diet consisting of fruits, vegetables and whole grains.

Does Loma Linda only accept Christians? ›

They DO accept non-Christian applicants.

Why is Loma Linda medical school not ranked? ›

Loma Linda administrators don't participate in the U.S. News & World Report rankings, which sends surveys to schools. Because the school only trains medical professionals and doesn't accept underclassmen, “we don't really qualify for a lot of surveys, so we just politely say 'thanks but no thanks,'” Carter said.

What are the 3 vegetables you should not eat? ›

Worst Veggie: Starchy Vegetables

Corn, peas, potatoes, pumpkin, squash, and yams tend to contain fewer vitamins and minerals and less fiber than other types of vegetables. Plus, they often contain two to three times as many calories per serving as their non-starchy vegetable counterparts.

Do Blue Zone eat eggs? ›

Eggs are consumed in all five Blue Zones diets, where people eat them an average of two to four times per week. As with meat protein, the egg is a side dish, eaten alongside a larger portion of a whole-grain or other plant-based feature.

What is the number 1 healthiest food in the world? ›

So, having scoured the full list of applicants, we have crowned kale as the number 1 healthiest food out there. Kale has the widest range of benefits, with the fewest drawbacks when stacked up against its competitors.

What are the secrets to longevity? ›

13 Habits Linked to a Long Life (Backed by Science)
  • Avoid overeating. The link between calorie intake and longevity currently generates a lot of interest. ...
  • Eat more nuts. ...
  • Try out turmeric. ...
  • Eat plenty of healthy plant foods. ...
  • Stay physically active. ...
  • Don't smoke. ...
  • Moderate your alcohol intake. ...
  • Prioritize your happiness.
Apr 8, 2019

Do blue zones drink alcohol? ›

You can consume alcohol and live to a happy 100, even up to one drink daily for women, two for men. We know from blue zones centenarians that this is true: People in four original blue zones areas drink alcohol moderately and regularly. The trick is to drink one to two glasses per day with friends and/or with food.

How can we live longest life? ›

Here are 10 steps that will help you have the longest, healthiest life possible:
  1. Don't smoke.
  2. Be physically active every day.
  3. Eat a healthy diet rich in whole grains, lean protein, vegetables, and fruits. ...
  4. Be sure to get enough vitamin D and calcium.
  5. Maintain a healthy weight and body shape.
  6. Challenge your mind.
Jan 11, 2012

What is the best exercise for longevity? ›

Tennis, badminton and soccer are all better for longevity than cycling, swimming, jogging or gym exercise, according to the research.

Do Blue Zones drink coffee? ›

Coffee is a daily ritual in blue zones areas, as well. Sardinians, Ikarians, and Nicoyans start their days with a cup, lightly sweetened without cream. In addition to a daily cup of coffee, blue zones centenarians drink water, tea and wine.

How do I get out of the Blue Zone? ›

Here are a few blue zones lessons for living slower and better.
  1. Have a religion or spiritual life. ...
  2. Feel beholden to a community. ...
  3. Grow a garden. ...
  4. Eat with family or friends. ...
  5. Do happy hour.
  6. Take a daily nap. ...
  7. Move more, move often, move naturally. ...
  8. Sleep enough.

Where do people live the longest? ›

At least five areas on Earth have been officially identified as "blue zones," where people live the longest and healthiest lives. The are Okinawa, Japan; Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica; Loma Linda, California; Ikaria, Greece; and Sardinia, Italy.

How many calories do blue zones eat? ›

Even today, their average daily intake is only about 1,900 calories (Sardinians traditionally ate a similarly lean diet of about 2,000 calories a day). Most centenarians in Nicoya, Sardinia, and Okinawa never had the chance to develop the habit of eating processed foods, soda pop, or salty snacks.

What is the 80% rule in blue zones? ›

80% Rule. People in Blue Zones areas stop eating when their stomachs are 80% full and eat their smallest meal in the early evening.

What nationality of people live longest? ›

The Top 10 Highest
RankCountryAvg.
1Hong Kong84.7
2Japan84.5
3Switzerland83.6
4Singapore83.7
6 more rows
Oct 19, 2021

What are the types of foods eaten in blue zones? ›

Beans reign supreme in blue zones. They're the cornerstone of every longevity diet in the world: black beans in Nicoya; lentils, garbanzo, and white beans in the Mediterranean; and soybeans in Okinawa. People in the blue zones eat at least four times as many beans as Americans do on average.

How long do people live in the Blue Zone? ›

While in the US, the average life expectancy is 78 years, in the Blue Zones, living to be over 100 isn't uncommon.

Where are the 5 Blue Zones located? ›

He has discovered five places in the world – dubbed blue zones – where people live the longest, and are healthiest: Okinawa, Japan; Sardinia, Italy; Nicoya, Costa Rica; Ikaria, Greece, and Loma Linda, California.

What are the 7 Blue Zones in the world? ›

They gave them official Blue Zone status: Ikaria, Greece; Okinawa, Japan; Ogliastra Region, Sardinia; Loma Linda, Calif.; and Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica. In the new book, which was released April 7, Buettner distills the researchers' findings on what all the Blue Zones share when it comes to their diet.

What makes a Blue Zone? ›

People in blue zones didn't have to embark on a special program to transform their lives. Luckily for them, they live in places where moving naturally all day, eating healthy, and connecting with neighbors is the norm.

What are the 9 secrets to longevity? ›

The nine lessons:
  • Move naturally. Don't do marathons or pump iron; work around the house, garden, walk, cycle, walk when talking on the phone. ...
  • Know your purpose. Have a reason for waking up in the morning.
  • Kick back. ...
  • Eat less. ...
  • Eat less meat. ...
  • Drink in moderation. ...
  • Have faith. ...
  • Power of love.
Nov 3, 2012

What are the secrets to longevity? ›

13 Habits Linked to a Long Life (Backed by Science)
  • Avoid overeating. The link between calorie intake and longevity currently generates a lot of interest. ...
  • Eat more nuts. ...
  • Try out turmeric. ...
  • Eat plenty of healthy plant foods. ...
  • Stay physically active. ...
  • Don't smoke. ...
  • Moderate your alcohol intake. ...
  • Prioritize your happiness.
Apr 8, 2019

Do blue zones drink alcohol? ›

You can consume alcohol and live to a happy 100, even up to one drink daily for women, two for men. We know from blue zones centenarians that this is true: People in four original blue zones areas drink alcohol moderately and regularly. The trick is to drink one to two glasses per day with friends and/or with food.

What do blue zones eat for breakfast? ›

Breakfasts. Centenarians from the blue zones typically eat a mainly plant-based diet. They favor beans, greens, yams and sweet potatoes, whole grains, fruits, nuts, and seeds. This recipe combines a few centenarians staples.

What is the best diet for longevity? ›

The foundation of the longevity diet
  • A legume and whole grain-rich pescatarian or vegetarian diet.
  • 30% of calories from vegetable fats such as nuts and olive oil.
  • A low but sufficient protein diet until age 65 and then moderate protein intake.
  • Low sugar and refined carbs.
  • No red or processed meat.
  • Limited white meat.
May 5, 2022

Do blue zones drink coffee? ›

Coffee is a daily ritual in blue zones areas, as well. Sardinians, Ikarians, and Nicoyans start their days with a cup, lightly sweetened without cream. In addition to a daily cup of coffee, blue zones centenarians drink water, tea and wine.

Do Blue Zones eat eggs? ›

Eggs are consumed in all five Blue Zones diets, where people eat them an average of two to four times per week. As with meat protein, the egg is a side dish, eaten alongside a larger portion of a whole-grain or other plant-based feature.

Where is the healthiest place in the world to live? ›

The healthiest countries are Japan and Switzerland

Japan took first place in the ranking. The country has one of the lowest levels of obesity in the world: 3.8% among men and 3.4% among women. For comparison, in the US the average percentage of obese people is 43%, and in the UK it is 35%.

What is a centenarian diet? ›

Ensure that your diet is 90% to 100% plant-based. Centenarians eat an impressive variety of garden vegetables and leafy greens (especially spinach, kale, beet and turnip tops, chard and collards) when they are in season. During the off-season, they pickle or dry the surplus.

How many calories do Blue Zones eat? ›

Even today, their average daily intake is only about 1,900 calories (Sardinians traditionally ate a similarly lean diet of about 2,000 calories a day). Most centenarians in Nicoya, Sardinia, and Okinawa never had the chance to develop the habit of eating processed foods, soda pop, or salty snacks.

Where do people live the longest? ›

At least five areas on Earth have been officially identified as "blue zones," where people live the longest and healthiest lives. The are Okinawa, Japan; Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica; Loma Linda, California; Ikaria, Greece; and Sardinia, Italy.

How can I live to 100? ›

Here are some healthful moves you can make to live a longer, fuller, happier life and age gracefully.
  1. Eat a healthy diet. This may seem like a no brainer, but it's important to eat healthy more often than not. ...
  2. Exercise regularly. ...
  3. Manage stress. ...
  4. Keep your mind active. ...
  5. Don't smoke. ...
  6. Think positive. ...
  7. Sleep.
Aug 27, 2019

Videos

1. Greece. The Oldest People In The World (Episode 6) | Full Documentary
(Science)
2. TODAY Visits ‘Blue Zone’ Of Costa Rica Where People Live To 100 | TODAY
(TODAY)
3. Costa Rica. The Oldest People In The World (Episode 4) | Full Documentary
(Science)
4. Why Japanese Live So Long ★ ONLY in JAPAN
(WAO RYU!ONLY in JAPAN)
5. Winter is HERE The Fall of many of Americans in this Disruptive Economy
(The Institute of Economic Thought )
6. 109-Year-Old Veteran and His Secrets to Life Will Make You Smile | Short Film Showcase
(National Geographic)

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